Tuesday, August 21, 2018

Dr Nandi Health Hero

A #HealthHero means being an advocate for yourself and your family, in sickness and in health. It’s about building the confidence to gain knowledge and use that knowledge to make tough decisions. I’m giving readers the necessary tools to become empowered and take ownership of his or her health choices. Whether addressing bullying or prostate cancer, community and purpose or fitness and nutrition, I am tackling tough questions, stimulating conversations, creating a new awareness of options and resources, and guiding readers to confidently make the choices that are best for them.”

More at 
Link to Book

Friday, August 3, 2018

EFCAM Mission/Vision

What is EFCAM? 

EFCAM is a Federation of European Federations of specific CAM modalities and national CAM umbrella organisations. Originating in December 2004 as a forum, before becoming a registered not for profit association, it has become the major voice for practitioners of CAM in Europe embracing some 20 CAM modalities in 23 countries.
EFCAM aims to:
• ensure freedom of choice in healthcare for the European public
• improve accessibility and availability of CAM services to the European public
• pursue recognition of CAM practices
• secure the legal right to practise of appropriately trained and regulated CAM practitioners in Europe
• have CAM included in EU health policy and strategy
• advise on regulatory structures and processes appropriate to CAM disciplines
• secure the participation of CAM experts in EU CAM research projects.
Visit Website
 Equitable access to healthcare, including CAM, and the sustainability of health services requires a shift towards health promotion and prevention of illness, and, towards more cost-effective treatment of illness. The CAM methods and CAM workforce are available to contribute to that.
Visit source

Monday, July 30, 2018

Chronic Fatigue Treatments I’ve Tried – Medical and Alternative

I thought it was about time I put a little post together for you of all the Chronic Fatigue treatments I tried during my time with CFS, which has proved to be one of my greatest teachers and still is to this day.
You might be surprised at how few I actually tried, especially when I was so sick. There were a few reasons for this:
1) I lived at home with my parents in a tiny village, so treatments options were few and far between. Therefore, I had to do my own thing with this bad boy.
2) I genuinely had no flippin’ idea what I was doing at the time, so felt absolutely clueless in taking action.
3) Even though CFS/ME were floating around at the time, I struggled to find a lot of helpful information about it. My parents also tried, but found it difficult as well.
4) I was sick, I mean, really sick, so felt unable to do anything. You know what I mean.

Friday, July 27, 2018

Mr Hancock… we have a workforce problem

Two articles that have made Nursing Times headlines in July together offer a powerful warning about the future of the nursing profession. It is not a new warning but it is one that has been growing in significance. 
Nursing Times reported last week that more than 250,000 people had signed a petition calling for student nurses to be paid a minimum living wage, following the scrapping of the bursary in 2017. The number of signatures has now passed 280,000.
It was started by student nurse John Worth at the beginning of July. He pointed out that, unlike other students, those studying nursing faced the additional pressure of having to complete 2,300 unpaid hospital-based clinical hours to join the Nursing and Midwifery Council’s register.

Friday, June 29, 2018

The highly sensitive person

Is this you?

  • Are you easily overwhelmed by such things as bright lights, strong smells, coarse fabrics, or sirens nearby?
  • Do you get rattled when you have a lot to do in a short amount of time?
  • Do you make a point of avoiding violent movies and TV shows?
  • Do you need to withdraw during busy days, into bed or a darkened room or some other place where you can have privacy and relief from the situation?
  • Do you make it a high priority to arrange your life to avoid upsetting or overwhelming situations?
  • Do you notice or enjoy delicate or fine scents, tastes, sounds, or works of art?
  • Do you have a rich and complex inner life?
  • When you were a child, did your parents or teachers see you as sensitive or shy?Click here to take the self-test.

Thursday, June 21, 2018

A Guide To The Most Useful Free Nursing Apps


*
A Guide To The Most Useful Free Nursing Apps
I am so thankful for my nursing apps! They cut down on my nursing duties and just make my job so much easier. I’m thrilled to share with you my picks for the most useful free nursing apps.


A completely free medical dictionary app containing medical disorders & diseases with detailed definitions, symptoms, causes and treatment information. It works offline without any type of data or network connection. This app provides comprehensive information about how to deal with symptoms/how to prevent the disease; and how to improve knowledge about diseases. It contains a symptom search that will list possible causes. Information on prescription drugs is also included.

How to Clear Negative Energy & Negative Thoughts

Everything found in the universe is made up of energy. This goes for both physical and nonphysical objects.
Basic physics and chemistry tells us that a physical object, such as a building, a tree, or this book, is made up of billions of individual atoms—little energy bundles that interact and bond with other atoms into many forms including water, metals, plants, soil, plastics, wood pulp, and other raw materials used to manufacture physical objects.
Nonphysical things—including thoughts, whether positive or negative thoughts are also made up of energy and, can also “bond” and interact with aspects and objects of our physical world.

How We Interact With Positive and Negative Energy

It’s well known, for instance, that our brain waves are a form of intense energy that can be easily detected with standard medical equipment—and that can interact with our physical world as any other form of energy would. Perhaps you’re wondering, what do I mean by “interact with our physical world”?

What India's Traditional Yoga Teachers Want You to Know for the International Day of Yoga

Yoga is among India’s most popular cultural exports. People across the globe have adopted the ancient practice for its physical, mental and spiritual benefits. But along the way, yoga has morphed and been adapted to suit the modern gym-going public, leading some yogis to voice concern that it has become little more than a series of stretching exercises, divorced from its roots as a meditative discipline.
In an attempt to find out the true essence and importance of yoga, TIME spoke to traditional Indian teachers for the International Day of Yoga, which falls on June 21. Here’s what they had to say.
Kanchen Mala, instructor, Mysore Krishnamacharr Yoga Shala
“You must remember that yoga isn’t just about physical fitness—you also have to be mentally fit. You can’t get distracted easily and your mind must be focused. How long can you hold an asana [pose]? How long can you control your breathing? That matters. Many care only about external beauty, but pay attention to the internal elements as well.

International Day of Yoga

Yoga is an ancient physical, mental and spiritual practice that originated in India. The word ‘yoga’ derives from Sanskrit and means to join or to unite, symbolizing the union of body and consciousness.
Today it is practiced in various forms around the world and continues to grow in popularity.
Recognizing its universal appeal, on 11 December 2014, the United Nations proclaimed 21 June as the International Day of Yoga by resolution 69/131.
The International Day of Yoga aims to raise awareness worldwide of the many benefits of practicing yoga.

Yoga for Peace
The theme for the 2018 celebration, organized by the Permanent Mission of India to the United Nations, is 'Yoga for Peace.

Bottled-Up Emotions at Work Lead to Burnout

You can’t tease out solutions to problems like employee burnout and dissatisfaction without first acknowledging something is off kilter. The core mindful practice — noticing and labelling thoughts — could be key to navigating high stress workplaces.

In many ways, figures like Mad Men’s Donald Draper still reign in the professional world: unsmiling suits, grabbing the next crisp white shirt from a desk drawer after pulling an all-nighter. Many leaders embody the always-on professional robot — that is, until fatigue, stress, and burnout strike.

Research suggests that if we attempt to repress how our work affects us — how our work affects our emotional health — it can lead to increased stress, less productivity, heightened depression and anxiety, and may even lead to a greater risk of disease.
Read more at Mindful.org

Monday, June 18, 2018

Social Bite is on a mission to bring Scotland together, to build a collaborative movement to end homelessness here


This seems to be a great initiative... for other countries also ... more information and a link to the main website are below


The statistics in Scotland are not insurmountable. What we need to do is to collectively focus on the issue. We need people from all walks of life in Scotland to come together and stick up for the most vulnerable people among us.

Social Bite is on a mission to bring Scotland together, to build a collaborative movement to end homelessness here. To do that we need to make houses available to the homeless, we need to fund a support resource for people to sustain their tenancies, and we need to integrate these vulnerable and marginalised people back into society – where they belong.

If you would like to read our full plan for ending homelessness, then please download the study we commissioned from Heriot Watt University entitled “Eradicating Core Homelessness in Scotland’s Four Largest Cities”.

Social Bite Website and more information

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Words of wisdom: my life in help help books

Health&Living columnist Katie Byrne has read hundreds of self-help books - some good, many bad. So which are the indispensible titles in the Katie canon?


You should never ask a woman her age, how many lovers she's had or how many self-help books she has read.
That's the answer I tend to give when the latter question is broached, although I'll concede that I've read quite a few. If you read the Breathing Space column in this magazine, you'll know that I try to glean insights from many self-development sources. Some are current, some are classics, but they're all, to my mind, worthy of being shared. But it's a huge market, and not everything you see on the shelves is worth reading. So how do you know which ones to try? As a general rule, I stay away from books that were panic-written in time for the January self-improvement market. I also avoid books that piggyback current trends, whether it's mindfulness, morning rituals or the latest Scandinavian lifestyle import.
And I have no truck with books that promise to "change your life!". If you really think you need to conclusively overhaul every aspect of your being, well then you're going to need more than a book. Self-development books work best when there's a specific challenge to overcome. If you want to deal with grief, break a habit or stop procrastinating, you'll find no shortage of excellent books by experts in the field. But if you walk into a bookshop hoping to change your life, you'd be better off reading your horoscope.

Athlone IT Nursing & Health Science Building