Thursday, June 21, 2018

A Guide To The Most Useful Free Nursing Apps


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A Guide To The Most Useful Free Nursing Apps
I am so thankful for my nursing apps! They cut down on my nursing duties and just make my job so much easier. I’m thrilled to share with you my picks for the most useful free nursing apps.


A completely free medical dictionary app containing medical disorders & diseases with detailed definitions, symptoms, causes and treatment information. It works offline without any type of data or network connection. This app provides comprehensive information about how to deal with symptoms/how to prevent the disease; and how to improve knowledge about diseases. It contains a symptom search that will list possible causes. Information on prescription drugs is also included.

How to Clear Negative Energy & Negative Thoughts

Everything found in the universe is made up of energy. This goes for both physical and nonphysical objects.
Basic physics and chemistry tells us that a physical object, such as a building, a tree, or this book, is made up of billions of individual atoms—little energy bundles that interact and bond with other atoms into many forms including water, metals, plants, soil, plastics, wood pulp, and other raw materials used to manufacture physical objects.
Nonphysical things—including thoughts, whether positive or negative thoughts are also made up of energy and, can also “bond” and interact with aspects and objects of our physical world.

How We Interact With Positive and Negative Energy

It’s well known, for instance, that our brain waves are a form of intense energy that can be easily detected with standard medical equipment—and that can interact with our physical world as any other form of energy would. Perhaps you’re wondering, what do I mean by “interact with our physical world”?

What India's Traditional Yoga Teachers Want You to Know for the International Day of Yoga

Yoga is among India’s most popular cultural exports. People across the globe have adopted the ancient practice for its physical, mental and spiritual benefits. But along the way, yoga has morphed and been adapted to suit the modern gym-going public, leading some yogis to voice concern that it has become little more than a series of stretching exercises, divorced from its roots as a meditative discipline.
In an attempt to find out the true essence and importance of yoga, TIME spoke to traditional Indian teachers for the International Day of Yoga, which falls on June 21. Here’s what they had to say.
Kanchen Mala, instructor, Mysore Krishnamacharr Yoga Shala
“You must remember that yoga isn’t just about physical fitness—you also have to be mentally fit. You can’t get distracted easily and your mind must be focused. How long can you hold an asana [pose]? How long can you control your breathing? That matters. Many care only about external beauty, but pay attention to the internal elements as well.

International Day of Yoga

Yoga is an ancient physical, mental and spiritual practice that originated in India. The word ‘yoga’ derives from Sanskrit and means to join or to unite, symbolizing the union of body and consciousness.
Today it is practiced in various forms around the world and continues to grow in popularity.
Recognizing its universal appeal, on 11 December 2014, the United Nations proclaimed 21 June as the International Day of Yoga by resolution 69/131.
The International Day of Yoga aims to raise awareness worldwide of the many benefits of practicing yoga.

Yoga for Peace
The theme for the 2018 celebration, organized by the Permanent Mission of India to the United Nations, is 'Yoga for Peace.

Bottled-Up Emotions at Work Lead to Burnout

You can’t tease out solutions to problems like employee burnout and dissatisfaction without first acknowledging something is off kilter. The core mindful practice — noticing and labelling thoughts — could be key to navigating high stress workplaces.

In many ways, figures like Mad Men’s Donald Draper still reign in the professional world: unsmiling suits, grabbing the next crisp white shirt from a desk drawer after pulling an all-nighter. Many leaders embody the always-on professional robot — that is, until fatigue, stress, and burnout strike.

Research suggests that if we attempt to repress how our work affects us — how our work affects our emotional health — it can lead to increased stress, less productivity, heightened depression and anxiety, and may even lead to a greater risk of disease.
Read more at Mindful.org

Monday, June 18, 2018

Social Bite is on a mission to bring Scotland together, to build a collaborative movement to end homelessness here


This seems to be a great initiative... for other countries also ... more information and a link to the main website are below


The statistics in Scotland are not insurmountable. What we need to do is to collectively focus on the issue. We need people from all walks of life in Scotland to come together and stick up for the most vulnerable people among us.

Social Bite is on a mission to bring Scotland together, to build a collaborative movement to end homelessness here. To do that we need to make houses available to the homeless, we need to fund a support resource for people to sustain their tenancies, and we need to integrate these vulnerable and marginalised people back into society – where they belong.

If you would like to read our full plan for ending homelessness, then please download the study we commissioned from Heriot Watt University entitled “Eradicating Core Homelessness in Scotland’s Four Largest Cities”.

Social Bite Website and more information

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Words of wisdom: my life in help help books

Health&Living columnist Katie Byrne has read hundreds of self-help books - some good, many bad. So which are the indispensible titles in the Katie canon?


You should never ask a woman her age, how many lovers she's had or how many self-help books she has read.
That's the answer I tend to give when the latter question is broached, although I'll concede that I've read quite a few. If you read the Breathing Space column in this magazine, you'll know that I try to glean insights from many self-development sources. Some are current, some are classics, but they're all, to my mind, worthy of being shared. But it's a huge market, and not everything you see on the shelves is worth reading. So how do you know which ones to try? As a general rule, I stay away from books that were panic-written in time for the January self-improvement market. I also avoid books that piggyback current trends, whether it's mindfulness, morning rituals or the latest Scandinavian lifestyle import.
And I have no truck with books that promise to "change your life!". If you really think you need to conclusively overhaul every aspect of your being, well then you're going to need more than a book. Self-development books work best when there's a specific challenge to overcome. If you want to deal with grief, break a habit or stop procrastinating, you'll find no shortage of excellent books by experts in the field. But if you walk into a bookshop hoping to change your life, you'd be better off reading your horoscope.

Achieving happiness: 20 of the wisest tips from self-help books

When your spirits are low, a little piece of wisdom can go a long way. Here we condense some of the best self-development books ever written into 20 essential life lessons, writes Katie Byrne


Every so often you come across a book - or even just a quote - that changes your perspective, reframes your thoughts and empowers you to overcome the mental hurdles that have been holding you back.
Sometimes it's a profound sentence that helps you transcend your darker hours; sometimes it's a practical coping skill you can put in your toolbox for the next time life gets the better of you.
Bibliotherapy, as it is known, is proven to promote good mental health, but where to start? The selection in the 'Mind, Body, Spirit' section of your local bookshop can look overwhelming and it should be noted that some of these books are considerably more therapeutic than others. With this in mind, we've read through dozens of self-development classics and gleaned the most enduring and empowering advice the authors have imparted.

Friday, April 13, 2018

What Do NICU Nurses Do?

Welcome to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit! We take care of the tiniest, and sometimes, sickest humans in the hospital. It is important to understand that premature infants are not only small, their entire body is premature and underdeveloped- their brain, their heart, their lungs, the GI system, their skin.
Ninety-eight percent of our days are great, but the 2% that are bad are really bad. Some days are feeding and cuddling babies that are close to going home, some days are holding a new mom’s hand as the team explains that it’s time for her to hold her baby while he dies. I love my specialty and wouldn’t trade it for anything.

What If Mistakes Are Actually Awesome?!


I didn’t know you can’t microwave metal until I did it. I didn’t know internet lines run underground until I cut one with a shovel. I didn’t know high heels sink in dirt until I wore a pair to an outdoor wedding. And while all of these caused inconvenient experiences in my life, I learned from them. So how can mistakes really be all that bad? What if mistakes are actually awesome?
Read More at Positively Positive

NINR and MedlinePlus® Launch a Palliative Care Text Campaign

NINR and the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus® have teamed up to offer a text message campaign for those living with serious illnesses and their families. The campaign launched on February 5, 2018 and offers weekly messages about palliative care in English and Spanish.
Read More at NINH

Are you a 'night owl' or a 'morning lark'? Research reveals who will live longer

'Night owls' - people who stay up late and struggle to get out of bed in the morning - are more likely to die younger than 'morning larks'.
New research by the University of Surrey and Northwestern University in the US found that people who naturally stay up late were 10pc more likely to die within the six-and-a-half-year study period compared to those who preferred the morning.
Researchers say that the ongoing stress of operating in a 9-5 society was having a huge impact on millions and could be shortening their lives. "This is a public health issue that can no longer be ignored," said Malcolm von Schantz, a professor of chronobiology at the University of Surrey.

Athlone IT Nursing & Health Science Building